It Already Exists

Photo of colorful, painted, empty picture frames

It’s been done before.—This is the classic argument our negative mind makes when trying to pursue something. Marie Forleo and Elizabeth Gilbert talk about this resistance. The perspective to remember is that [it] hasn’t yet been done by you.

Gilbert points out “Even Shakespeare repeated stories but told them a different way, and we’re still talking about it. You’re allowed to add to the pile of art. When art comes from the heart, it comes out differently than those who just borrow for the sake of that. Create because it brings you joy.”

Remember this the next time you’re told that the field you’re pursuing is oversaturated. There is room for one more designer, developer, consultant—whatever it is you’re trying to pursue. You’re adding value by creating. Just because a field is crowded does not mean everyone has been doing it at their best. Perhaps it’s about time you show the world how to do it right by bringing you to it.

What are you bringing to the table?


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Follow the Discomfort

Photo of a Porsche

A friend of mine recommended that I check out the TEDxUCLA talk called “Go with your Gut Feeling” from Magnus Walker. I have never heard of this name, but after listening to his talk I’ll never forget it.

From the outside appearance, you may perceive Magnus Walker as someone wandering through life not likely to get anywhere. In learning his story, it’s a reminder that appearances are not what they seem. Magnus Walker is this free-spirited person, but he is also widely successful. He has built a clothing company, a film location business, and taps into various areas of Porsche cars—restoration, racing, driving, and collecting. He is sought out by companies for collaborations and partnerships. When you hear him talk, he’s so humble about it. He didn’t even know why he was selected to give a TED talk to begin with.

At the end of his talk, his message is simple. Having gone through all the experiences he has been through, he recommends to simply follow your gut feeling. When it feels a bit awkward, that’s a sure sign you’re going in the right direction. Secondly, you need to stay motivated and dedicated.

He describes how he never asked for anyone’s opinion but rather followed his gut and did what he wanted to do. He followed his passion. It’s not much more complicated than that. It’s a phrase we hear often: “follow your passion“, but so few people do this. I can’t count anymore the number of people who offer their opinions about how I should live my life after grad school—where to work, where to live, what to do here and there. All of this is based on what they think success is.

What is so refreshing here is that when Magnus Walker says to follow your gut and passion, he means it because he’s living it. And it’s working out well for him. My observation of people telling me how to live my own life while they continuously complain about their own shows the resistance people having in following their own passion. Perhaps by steering people into following “their path”, they are protecting themselves from facing the truth that they never chose to live their true passion themselves. Perhaps they didn’t have the courage to follow it and ignored their gut feeling instead of listening to it.

It’s not easy to follow your gut, to live your passion, to really be authentic. This is why everyone doesn’t do it. But every now and then you hear an awesome story, like that of Magnus Walker’s; and the refresh button gets hit. Yes, do what you love to do. You only live once.

“Two roads diverged in a wood, and I—
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.”
-Robert Frost


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